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Jim Harding Columns

Jim Harding is a retired professor of justice studies at the University of Regina. He is a founding member of the Regina Group for a Non-Nuclear Society and was director of research for Prairie Justice Research at the University of Regina, where he headed up the Uranium Inquiries Project. Jim also acted as consultant to the NFB award-winning film Uranium. He is the author of Canada’s Deadly Secret: Saskatchewan Uranium and the Global Nuclear System.

A Rude Awakening: The Northern Walk to Regina for a Nuclear Waste Ban

On August 16th several hundred people walked the green mile along Regina’s Albert Street, taking their call for a provincial nuclear waste ban to the government.

800 KM Walk Heats Up Nuclear Waste Controversy

Much has happened since the Forum for Truth on Nuclear Waste Storage was held in Beauval June 2nd.

Why The Northern Saskatchewan Forum Voted To Ban Nuclear Wastes

On the afternoon of June 2nd two hundred people mostly from ten northern communities gathered in the school auditorium at Beauval for the “Forum for Truth on Nuclear Waste Storage”.

Canada Falling Behind Global Trend To Green Energy

Recent UN reports confirm that the shift to green energy (renewables, energy efficiency and bio-energy) is gaining ground globally.

What Harper's Majority Means for our Sustainability

After five years, three elections and a lot of attack ads, Harper finally got his majority government.

Petition For Nuclear Waste Ban Presented To Premier Wall

On April 14th a petition calling for a legislated ban on nuclear wastes was presented to Premier Wall?s government.

Health and Trust: Hard Lessons from Chernobyl and Fukushima

Health has barely made it into the federal election. But it and the related issue of “trust” are at the top of our concerns.

Harper's Bullying Won't Enhance Participatory Democracy or Sustainability

Ideally our listening skills will increase during this election. Informed consent requires that we don’t just vote from prejudice or simple habit.

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