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Wild rice and high water - A northern harvest under threat

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Northern Saskatchewan produces the majority of Canada’s wild rice.

"Wild rice is particular about where, when, and how it grows. “We’re very susceptible to high water...If it comes up at a certain time of the year, it drowns the wild rice. In the past, heavy rains and high water would cause damage one year out of every five, on average. “It’s more like two years out of five now [that] we have problems with the higher water flooding, with the water coming up in our lakes.”

Nuclear Waste Storage by Gordon Edwards, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility (CCNR)

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CCNR recommends that the current suspension of licensing decisions by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should be continued indefinitely until the NRC has established detailed plans for the long term management of irradiated nuclear fuel that is not based on the unwarranted assumption that a safe permanent walk-away disposal method will become available within a few decades.

"radioactive cleanup" suggests that we can somehow "get rid" of radioactive contamination -- but we cannot do so

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A central fact about radioactivity is that no one knows how to turn it off. Radioactive materials continue to emit atomic radiation at a rate which cannot be influenced by any of the usual factors... NOTHING can be used to speed, up, slow down, or stop the process of radioactive disintegration from occurring.

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