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Don't trade global warming for nuclear meltdowns

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The climate change crisis is upon us. The world's leading climate scientists agree that time is rapidly running out and that urgent steps are needed in the next 10 years to dramatically reduce our carbon emissions.

But exchanging global warming for nuclear meltdown is not the answer.

Pandora’s Promise: Marshalling Hope for Yet Another Nuclear Comeback

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The Greek God Zeus sent the first woman, Pandora, to Earth where, compelled by curiosity she let evil escape from the jar gifted to her. But the Patriarchs apparently had a covert plan, for at the bottom of Pandora’s Box was the promise of “hope”. The Breakthrough Institute funders and Robert Stone, director of the new film Pandora’s Promise, want us to place that hope in a new generation of nuclear breeder reactors called the Integral Fast Reactors (IFR), to avert a climate crisis.

Fukushima: The Saskatchewan Connection

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It’s over two and one-half years since the nuclear meltdowns at Fukushima, Japan and the contamination hasn’t stopped. It is getting so serious that the IAEA, the UN’s nuclear body recently recategorized the situation as a nuclear event # 3 on its 7-point scale. Tepco, the company in charge, hasn’t been able to stop the radioactive contamination of groundwater pouring into the Pacific Ocean.

Cameco Dodging Corporate Tax CBC SK September 19, 2013

From the Huffington Post: "Cameco is a multi-billion Canadian company that mines Canadian uranium, uses Canadian-developed technology, and relies on Canadian transportation system. Cameco employees use the Canadian education system, the Canadian health system, and they rely on the stability and legal protection that a Canadian democracy provides. Former Canadian Deputy Prime Minister, Anne McLellan sits on the board of directors. Funny thing, though; like many transnational companies, Cameco has decided that it is good business practice to park its profits offshore -- to the notorious tax haven of Zug, a city in Switzerland. Cameco pays the good people of Zug a ten per cent corporate tax rate for their trouble -- instead of a Canadian corporate rate of 27 per cent. Mind you, Cameco doesn't really have any operations to speak in that city. So it is easy money for Zug."

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